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Taiwan Day 4 – Kaohsiung-Taichung (Mar 2)

March 2, 2013

After a short four days, it was time to bid Kaohsiung goodbye as we made our way to Taichung for the middle-half of our Taiwanese journey.

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Eliz G. checks out of Sanduo Hotel with her Hello Kitty luggage that she got from Hong Kong.

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Since we had walked to Sanduo Shopping District Station (the station closest to our hotel) the day before, we decided to walk to there again and board a train to get to Zuoying Station, the transfer station for the Taiwan High Speed Rail (THSR) that would take us to Taichung.

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Before boarding the THSR, you should bring loads of snacks (and maybe even lunch if you’ve not eaten) with you. At Zuoying, the 7-Eleven outlet is really huge, and if you are a milk tea lover like I am, you just have to try the roasted milk tea they sell (extreme left). Their mocha (bottle in red) isn’t all that bad either.

TAIWAN HIGH SPEED RAIL (THSR) ZUOYING STATION

Inside-Zuoying-THSR

THSR Zuoying Station is perpetually crowded.

Inside-the-THSR

Perhaps because we were at the furthest station from Taipei, the THSR cabin was relatively empty. (When boarding the train, all bulky luggage must be placed in compartments at the head and rear of each cabin.

TAIWAN HIGH SPEED RAIL (THSR) TAICHUNG STATION

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Upon reaching Taichung after an hour’s journey, I received the shock of my life – it was freezing! I’d guess the temperature to be around 12 degrees Celsius or so, compared to an estimated 20 degrees Celsius back in Kaohsiung. No wonder even commuters dressed differently here.

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This is the train that brought us from Kaohsiung to Taichung. Doesn’t it look sleek?

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Outdoors, the winds only get more chilly. I was wearing about four layers of clothing underneath my hoodie, and still I couldn’t help but shiver.

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At the THSR Taichung Station, there were many strange shops. Located right outside one of them was this choo-choo train, made entirely out of cardboard, or so it seemed.

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The station even had a shop that cat lovers will, well, love. Almost everything they carry has a cat design on them.

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Here are some of their cuter cat pouches, selling at TWD$280 each.

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Here are the Taichung MRT standard tickets that we took to get to the station nearest our hotel, Forte Orange Business Hotel.

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Taichung MRT stations look hardly this eerie in reality. They do look rather old fashioned though, and back home in Singapore, I’ve never seen a station quite like this.

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Eliz G. takes a video of the station to WhatsApp to her parents back home.

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The train that whisks us away is an old fashioned one (right). It moves slowly, makes a lot of noise, and feels straight out of a 1980s movie. It is amazing.

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The inside of the MRT was jam packed as usual though.

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Unlike Singaporean trains (and those in Kaohsiung and Taipei), in Taichung, the train’s driver would exit from his cabin at every stop, insert a key into a mechanical gizmo above the train’s doors, and manually press “open”, “warning”, and “close” to operate the doors. It’s just like in storybooks!

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The station we alighted was teeming with people, dressed very differently from how they do in Kaohsiung. Only occasionally would we see the stranger in a pair of shorts or in a skirt, for it was far too cold here to be dressed like that.

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Crowds lessen once one exits the station.

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Finally, after a short cab ride, we and our luggage reached Forte Orange Business Hotel safely. Isn’t its lobby beautiful?

YI ZHONG JIE NIGHT MARKET

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Yi Zhong Jie was the first and only Night Market that we explored entirely on our own. It’s youthful, lively, and relatively cheap. But still, prices are slightly higher than night markets in Kaohsiung.

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Here’s a stall where you can pick whatever goodies you want, and a lady will fry them for you.

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Shoes on display at Yi Zhong Jie.

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Stalls line the streets of the night market, making your every turn an eye-opening one.

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Here’s a petrol station we ran into on the way back to our hotel.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. sol jung permalink
    December 8, 2014 6:14 am

    Hello~ I was looking for a pic of milk tea. can I use one of your picture? the picture of milk tea! Hope to hear from you!

    • Shana permalink*
      December 14, 2014 3:20 am

      Hi! Yes sure:) Go ahead!

    • Shana permalink*
      December 14, 2014 3:20 am

      Just use one without my face in it if possible ya:)

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