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I’ve moved!

January 21, 2014

Hi guys!

Sorry about this! but I’ve decided to relocate myself and I’m now writing at littlecorals.wordpress.com! 🙂

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There’s nothing much on that platform yet, but I’ll be updating it as I go along:)

Please visit! 🙂 ❤

 

Love love!

Ray Ban Clubmasters

May 1, 2013

For someone who gave up on contacts about a year ago (because they were simply too high maintenance and too costly to continue with the horrid degree that I have), getting a new pair of spectacles is a mean feat. And so… here’s my new pair.

My Raybans   Ray Ban Clubmasters 5154 2372. And also, Mine.

Taiwan Day 5 – Taichung (Mar 3)

March 3, 2013

Before I had even left for Taiwan, Ma had made it a point to remind me daily to try and make time to visit Sun Moon Lake for the “spectacular views and fresh air”. Elevated 748 metres above sea level, it is after all, the only natural big lake in Taiwan. Finally, on today’s agenda, we headed there.

Breakfast at the hotel

Eliz G. having a hearty breakfast at Forte Orange Hotel, Taichung.

A round trip to Sun Moon Lake will only set you NT$340 poorer. Catching the bus, on the other hand, is a whole other challenge. It’ll take one and a half hours to two hours to get you there from Taichung, depending on weather and traffic conditions. Nap!

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After a quick dash to purchase tickets, we boarded the bus to Sun Moon Lake!

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Here’s our round trip tickets, that look an awful lot like receipts.

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At Sun Moon Lake’s Shuishe Visitor Centre, one and a half hours later.

Visit the Shuishe Visitor Centre to get information on activities you can do when at the lake itself – and of course, don’t forget to ask when’s the last bus home. For us, that was at 7.10.

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Eliz G. asks the lady at the information counter all we wanted to know.

It was while speaking to the lady at the counter when we learned about the Sun Moon Lake Pass, which grants access to buses that bring you to the various attractions round the lake, cable cars that ride high above the treetops, and ferries sailing across the gorgeous lake itself.

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Here’s our Sun Moon Lake Pass.

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Boarding the bus was a breeze after that.

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Tickets get torn off our passes as they get used.

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Sun Moon Lake seems to be crazy about One Piece. You’ll soon find out just how crazy.

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Too bad it was off season, but here’s a (wilting) cherry blossom we found. I’ve never seen one before today.

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Me at the cable cars place!

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A modern looking cable car station housing loads of cable cars.

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They simply drift into the mountaintops.

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Let’s get into a cable car!

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For your convenience, here’s things not to do.

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I couldn’t have been more excited! The last time I rode a cable car, it was from Mount Faber to Sentosa, which was when I was, er, I don’t know, five?

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It was a foggy day though, and the clouds quickly descended upon us. And the best part about the whole thing was that it was so silent you could hear a pin drop.

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We could barely see the cable cars in front and behind us.

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Here’s where the cable car stopped! I’m actually not too sure where this is.

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Step. Breathe. Step. Breathe. Step. Breathe.

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Here’s a little hut we saw. I think it was part of the Formosa Aboriginal Centre, but that’s entirely from memory and I have no idea if I’m right.

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Like I said! Crazy about One Piece. You’ll find merchandise like this everywhere.

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Well back into the cable car we go!

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The ride comes to an end.

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On the walk back to the busstop, we came across this intricately woven spiderweb. I’ve never seen anything like it so I was practically jumping for joy. I’d be jumping for something other reason entirely had the spider emerged.

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A short walk away is Butterfly Park!

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Here’s the trail leading to the park itself.

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We didn’t enter it really, but it looked pretty buggy from the outside. Which is creepy.

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This, believe it or not, is the net house’s roof.

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And we board the bus again.

Location Map

Itashao is a nice place to do shopping, though most of the things you’d find are touristy items like a giant toy bow, which Eliz G. bought for NT$200. You also could get a decent tea egg though.

Location Map

Tourists crowd the streets of Ita Thao.

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Just some of the merchandise you can get here.

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Be sure to visit Mao Wan Yeh’s tea shop, because you’d not only get to look at ancestral pictures, if you’re lucky, you’ll also get a free cup of tea. (A tiny bag of it costs NT$1,500). SO TREASURE YOUR TEA.

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Here’s my cupful of thousand dollar tea. (Which Eliz G. bought for her granny. Aww!)

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Tea eggs ready for the eating.

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Ferry time!

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Here’s the harbour and the ferries behind us.

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It’s so foggy that we practically couldn’t see a thing.

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Here’s me after our ride!

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Finally we took a walk back to the visitor centre station.

Taiwan Day 4 – Kaohsiung-Taichung (Mar 2)

March 2, 2013

After a short four days, it was time to bid Kaohsiung goodbye as we made our way to Taichung for the middle-half of our Taiwanese journey.

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Eliz G. checks out of Sanduo Hotel with her Hello Kitty luggage that she got from Hong Kong.

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Since we had walked to Sanduo Shopping District Station (the station closest to our hotel) the day before, we decided to walk to there again and board a train to get to Zuoying Station, the transfer station for the Taiwan High Speed Rail (THSR) that would take us to Taichung.

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Before boarding the THSR, you should bring loads of snacks (and maybe even lunch if you’ve not eaten) with you. At Zuoying, the 7-Eleven outlet is really huge, and if you are a milk tea lover like I am, you just have to try the roasted milk tea they sell (extreme left). Their mocha (bottle in red) isn’t all that bad either.

TAIWAN HIGH SPEED RAIL (THSR) ZUOYING STATION

Inside-Zuoying-THSR

THSR Zuoying Station is perpetually crowded.

Inside-the-THSR

Perhaps because we were at the furthest station from Taipei, the THSR cabin was relatively empty. (When boarding the train, all bulky luggage must be placed in compartments at the head and rear of each cabin.

TAIWAN HIGH SPEED RAIL (THSR) TAICHUNG STATION

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Upon reaching Taichung after an hour’s journey, I received the shock of my life – it was freezing! I’d guess the temperature to be around 12 degrees Celsius or so, compared to an estimated 20 degrees Celsius back in Kaohsiung. No wonder even commuters dressed differently here.

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This is the train that brought us from Kaohsiung to Taichung. Doesn’t it look sleek?

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Outdoors, the winds only get more chilly. I was wearing about four layers of clothing underneath my hoodie, and still I couldn’t help but shiver.

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At the THSR Taichung Station, there were many strange shops. Located right outside one of them was this choo-choo train, made entirely out of cardboard, or so it seemed.

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The station even had a shop that cat lovers will, well, love. Almost everything they carry has a cat design on them.

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Here are some of their cuter cat pouches, selling at TWD$280 each.

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Here are the Taichung MRT standard tickets that we took to get to the station nearest our hotel, Forte Orange Business Hotel.

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Taichung MRT stations look hardly this eerie in reality. They do look rather old fashioned though, and back home in Singapore, I’ve never seen a station quite like this.

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Eliz G. takes a video of the station to WhatsApp to her parents back home.

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The train that whisks us away is an old fashioned one (right). It moves slowly, makes a lot of noise, and feels straight out of a 1980s movie. It is amazing.

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The inside of the MRT was jam packed as usual though.

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Unlike Singaporean trains (and those in Kaohsiung and Taipei), in Taichung, the train’s driver would exit from his cabin at every stop, insert a key into a mechanical gizmo above the train’s doors, and manually press “open”, “warning”, and “close” to operate the doors. It’s just like in storybooks!

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The station we alighted was teeming with people, dressed very differently from how they do in Kaohsiung. Only occasionally would we see the stranger in a pair of shorts or in a skirt, for it was far too cold here to be dressed like that.

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Crowds lessen once one exits the station.

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Finally, after a short cab ride, we and our luggage reached Forte Orange Business Hotel safely. Isn’t its lobby beautiful?

YI ZHONG JIE NIGHT MARKET

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Yi Zhong Jie was the first and only Night Market that we explored entirely on our own. It’s youthful, lively, and relatively cheap. But still, prices are slightly higher than night markets in Kaohsiung.

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Here’s a stall where you can pick whatever goodies you want, and a lady will fry them for you.

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Shoes on display at Yi Zhong Jie.

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Stalls line the streets of the night market, making your every turn an eye-opening one.

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Here’s a petrol station we ran into on the way back to our hotel.

Taiwan Day 3 – Kaohsiung (Mar 1)

March 1, 2013

The third day of our trip was really the first we spent exploring Kaohsiung all on our own. And first on our agenda was to find our way to the renowned Lotus Lake. We happened to be lucky and came across a phone shop along the way.

Almost entirely by chance, while on the way to Sanduo Shopping District Station, Eliz G. and I passed by a phone shop, and decided to try our luck. It worked! Eliz G. successfully got for herself a prepaid SIM Card with internet access, just for TWD$450. It lasted the remaining 7 days of our Taiwan trip. (It costs TWD$550 to get a prepaid SIM Card for calling and texting.) I decided not to get one myself since I could piggyback on her hotspot.

SANDUO SHOPPING DISTRICT STATION

After about a 15 minute walk from Sanduo Hotel, where we stayed at, we reached the entrance of Sanduo Shopping District Station.

A cutesy little shop at Sanduo Shopping District Station.

There aren’t very many shops in the underground walkway leading to the train station, but one that caught our eyes was a cutesy little shop that seemed to sell a bit of everything, at prices similar to those at the night markets of Kaohsiung.

Random stuff in the cutesy shop.

Here’s petite sized bottles of perfumes, bars of soap, and keychains (I think).

Unattended mini crane machine arcade.

Just next to the little cutesy shop was a completely unattended arcade, which had about 20 crane machines in it.

Me playing the crane game.

For TWD$10, I decided to try my luck at getting a Lilo and Stitch plushie. Sob, I failed.

Buying a standard ticket from Sanduo Shopping District Station to Zuoying Station. It costs TWD$30 if I remember correctly.

Buying a standard ticket from Sanduo Shopping District Station to Zuoying Station, where we were headed, was surprisingly easy despite most of the words being in Chinese. The one way trip only cost TWD$30, if my memory hasn’t failed me.

The inside of a Kaohsiung MRT Train.

Commuters in the train act more or less the same as back home in Singapore, I’d assume. The only difference I spotted was that many of them wear face masks.

ZUOYING STATION

Zuoying Station.

After about a 20 minute journey, we arrived at Zuoying Station.

INSIDE BUS 301

On the bus to Lotus Lake!

Finding our way to Lotus Lake, where we were headed, was much of a challenge, mainly because their bus stops look very different from the way they do back home. For one thing, they don’t have shelters, and for another thing, all the information boards we found were entirely in Chinese! Bus drivers in Kaohsiung were very friendly to us, however, and from speaking to them, we managed to get our bearings and boarded the right bus.

LOTUS LAKE

Here's where you get off the bus!

After another 20 minute long journey that made us TWD$12 poorer, we arrived at our destination. It doesn’t look like much, but Lotus Lake is a mere 5 minute walk from this bus stop. In fact, we wouldn’t even have known where to get down had the bus driver not called out to us all the way from his seat, telling us that this is where we were to alight.

Plants growing in the vicinity.

Surrounding the bus stop were strange looking plants (weeds?) growing in the vicinity.

When in Kaohsiung, one place you cannot afford to miss for all its beautiful scenic sights is Lotus Lake. Located on the northern outskirts of the city, the lake is home to numerous temples, pagodas, and pavilions.We visited it at about 3 in the afternoon, but the lake is said to be the most beautiful a few hours later, where the water reflects the evening’s setting sun.

LOTUS LAKE: DRAGON AND TIGER PAGODAS

Our first sight of the pagodas.

Our first sight of the famous Dragon and Tiger Pagodas, from a vantage point a short walk away from the lake.

A silly girl thinking her finger was touching the tip of the pagodas. Man was I off.

A silly girl thinking her finger was touching the tip of the pagodas. Man was I off.

The pagodas up close!

These are the back of the Dragon and Tiger Pagodas up close!

One of the pagodas.

Just one of the Dragon and Tiger pagodas reach so high up into the skies above.

The pagodas from far away! Sorry I got a little obsessed.

Upon looking back at the pagodas from a distance, it became apparent how much more beautiful they would have been had the lake’s lotus been in bloom as well.

LOTUS LAKE: SPRING AND AUTUMN PAVILIONS

These two pavilions, completed in 1951, are dedicated to the God of War, Kuan Kung. It boasts beautiful wall paintings and brilliantly positioned statues. It is located to the southwest of Lotus Lake.

Another temple.

The entrance to Lotus Lake’s Spring and Autumn Pavilions.

Second temple pagoda thingy

The pavilion nearest to the dragon’s tail.

temple people and a birdy

Statues fixated at the Spring and Autumn Pavilions.

E’Z CHOCOLAT

Where: No. 51 Cingnian 2nd Rd, Lingya Dist, Kaohsiung City 80248, Taiwan.

After a sunny day at Lotus Lake, a great place to cool off would be E’Z Chocolat. (It costs about TWD$250 to get there by taxi though.)

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The storefront of E’Z Chocolat.

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Everything served in the metal tray is free. We got an aromatic cup of tea, and two complimentary chocolates that just melt in your mouth.

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E’Z Chocolat has a fine chocolate selection, and here are only a few of what they offer.

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Once the air conditioning of the place gets to you, have a cup of hot chocolate and be in for a little surprise – the spoon served to you as its stirrer is made entirely out of milk chocolate itself! It melts perfectly into your warm mug of hot chocolate, giving that great chocolatey taste. I must admit, its biscuits accompanying the beverage are a little on the hard and dry side though, but they accompany the think drink rather well.

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A chocolate cake that R. ordered.

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I can’t remember what this is called, but it looks good doesn’t it!

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I’m not very sure why, but I found mahjong shaped chocolate put into my hands as we were about to leave.

NAN HUA TOURIST NIGHT MARKET

Walking along the streets of Nan Hua Tourist Night Market.

Apparel you can find in the night market.

Apparel you can find in the night market.

A little place for dinner.

A little place for dinner.

A little sushi stall.

A little sushi stall.

MARINA PUB
Where: No. 101, Dayi St. (Wu-Fu 4th Road) Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
Tel: (07) 521-5052

marina pub

marina pub

Marina pub inside

Marina pub inside

Taiwan Day 2 – Kaohsiung (Feb 28)

February 28, 2013

We arose from bed still in unbelief. Were we really where we thought we were? Yes. It was so. The air was crisp, our fingers were pleasantly cold, and we were ready to explore Kaohsiung some more… after some breakfast.

Eliz G. having breakfast at Sanduo Hotel.

Eliz G. having breakfast at Sanduo Hotel.

The view from our hotel window.

The view from our hotel window.

While waiting for Eliz G.’s friend R., we decided to take a little walk around our hotel. Taiwan during the day is incredibly different from how it is at night, where buildings are dark rectangles and streets are rainbows of colour. During the day, it also is surprisingly warm. I was sweltering in my hoodie.

The outside of Sanduo Hotel.

The outside of Sanduo Hotel.

Scooters lining the streets of Kaohsiung.

Scooters lining the streets of Kaohsiung.

Me at Sanduo Hotel's entrance.

Me at Sanduo Hotel’s entrance.

Feeling slightly peckish, we head to the nearest 7-Eleven, looking for a snack, and man, were we in for a surprise. The 7-Eleven outlets here are MASSIVE in comparison to the ones in Singapore. Not only is there ample walking space, there’s also free wifi, and in certain outlets, there are even tables and chairs for you to eat. Plus, their onigiris are a triple must (must-must-must) try.

Eliz G. picking what to eat at 7-Eleven.

Eliz G. picking what to eat at 7-Eleven.

Soon after, we caught up with Eliz G.’s friend R. and his friend, M., who is a resident of Kaohsiung, and having a little time on our hands, tried in all desperation to purchase a sim card for usage in Taiwan. It ended in utter failure. Apparently to get a sim card here, tourists need both their passport and a secondary form of identification, which can be a student card, an identity card, or  a driver’s licence. Also, they need to be above 20. (I was half a year away from that.)

And so, phone-card-less, we head to a traditional Taiwanese eatery that M. frequents.

Enjoy awesome Taiwanese traditional fare at 來來豆漿高雄店 (Lai Lai Dou Jiang Kaohsiung Dian).

Enjoy awesome Taiwanese traditional fare at
來來豆漿高雄店 (Lai Lai Dou Jiang Kaohsiung Dian).

LAI LAI DOU JIANG KAOHSIUNG DIAN
Where: 高雄巿九如一路976號
Tel: (07) 380-7448

It isn’t a large eatery, and in many ways, it kind of resembles coffee shops we have back in Singapore – except in this case, it would be more like an entire coffee shop housing just one stall. Yet in my three days here (okay fine it’s just three days, but still), I couldn’t find anyplace else that had food that tasted so authentic.

Beef Xiao Long Bao

Beef Xiao Long Bao, TWD$80 for 10.

My dough fritter (that I already took a bite out of, so it's kind of unsightly. Sorry.)

My dough fritter (that I already took a bite out of, so it’s kind of unsightly. Sorry.)

Beef Wrap.

Beef Wrap, TWD$100 for 2.

At first sight, I thought these were Taiwanese versions of popiah that we have back home, which is a kind of spring roll (I think), that has an extremely soft skin and comprises bean sprouts, boiled eggs, lettuce leaves, and carrots. Instead, this beef wrap seemed more like cooked beef wrapped in chapati (a type of Indian bread that my father loves). Instead of being soft and mushy, the wrap was hard and slightly crunchy even. It was a strange taste, but I could get used to it.

Wanton Mee.

Wanton Mee, TWD$55.

Donuts on display.

Donuts on display.

You Tiao on display.

You Tiao on display.

Bing Dou Jiang.

Bing Dou Jiang, TWD$20 (cold), TWD$14 (hot).

Feeling full from the local fare (it was one of the rare days where we actually sat down and ate a meal instead of snacking all day on night market goodies), we felt lazy and took a short cab ride to Formosa Boulevard Station.

Streets surrounding Formosa Boulevard Station.

Streets surrounding Formosa Boulevard Station.

Formos Boulevard Station Entrance.

Formosa Boulevard Station Entrance.

The train station itself is huge, probably (and this is just my rough guess) the size of City Hall MRT back home. It’s situated at the transfer line, connecting Kaohsiung MRT’s Red and Orange Line.

Eliz G. and I at a random poster in Formosa Boulevard Station.

Eliz G. (left) and I (right) posing at a random poster in Formosa Boulevard Station.

The Kaohsiung MRT Map at Formosa Boulevard Station.

The Kaohsiung MRT Map at Formosa Boulevard Station.

It’s real crowning glory is not its structural size, however. The station also plays host to the largest public art installation in the world, the Dome of Light. The dome, created by Narcissus Quagliata, was made from individual pieces of coloured glass and took nearly four years to finish.

Formosa Boulevard Station's crowning glory, its Dome of Light.

Formosa Boulevard Station’s crowning glory, its Dome of Light.

Here's the Kaohsiung MRT one way standard ticket! Isn't it cute? It's just a little coin!

Here’s the Kaohsiung MRT one way standard ticket! Isn’t it cute? It’s just a little coin!

Train staff at the MRT.

Eliz G. tapping out of Central Park Station with the cute little coin standard ticket.

Eliz G. tapping out of Central Park Station with the cute little coin standard ticket. It costs TWD$20 to get from Formosa Boulevard Station to Central Park Station.

The Dried Egg Shop

The Dried Egg Shop

得意中華
Where: Exit from Central Park Station and turn left. It’s the first shop you’d see. (That’s just the outlet we visited.)
Website: www.de-food.com.tw

Samples from 得意中華.

Samples from 得意中華.

I suppose if you do enjoy preserved eggs, this would be a good place to get them. Unfortunately, I have little taste for preserved food, so I’ve nothing much to say other than their eggs are extremely salty, and their yolks seem a little too large. Their egg whites (or the remnants of what used to be an egg white?) are surprisingly firm though, which makes a strange yet somehow pleasant mouthful.

EP House at Central Park Station.

EP House at Central Park Station.

EP House
Where: It’s right beside 得意中華!
Website: www.ep-house.com.tw

Preserved foods at EP House.

Preserved foods at EP House.

Mobile Library at Central Park Station.

Mobile Library at Central Park Station.

Upon exiting the station, we came across a mobile library! I have no idea how it works though. (Couldn’t read the chinese characters on it.) But wouldn’t this be a great idea to implement at our MRT stations back home? 🙂

In Taiwan, it seems that everyone stands on the right hand side of the escalator, and the left hand side is only for those in a hurry.

In Taiwan, it seems that everyone stands on the right hand side of the escalator, and the left hand side is only for those in a hurry.

Here's Eliz G. playing a game at a road side stall - if you land your arrow on the sign indicating one scoop or something like that, you get one scoop. The highest number of scoops you can get is five! And she was lucky because she landed on a one but got two scoops from the kind ice cream man.

Here’s Eliz G. playing a game at a road side stall – if you land your arrow on the sign indicating one scoop or something like that, you get one scoop. The highest number of scoops you can get is five! And she was lucky because she landed on a one but got two scoops from the kind ice cream man.

After ice cream, we took a 2 minute walk to Shinkuchan, what R. told us was the most youthful shopping district in Kaohsiung.

The entrance to Shinkuchan.

The entrance to Shinkuchan.

The insane crowds at Shinkuchan.

He was right. We found ourselves pushing against unsweaty bodies (it started to get a little chilly then).

Happy Life Leisure V.S Cafe' store front.

Happy Life Leisure V.S Cafe’ store front.

HAPPY LIFE LEISURE V.S CAFE’
Where: 高雄巿仁智街273號

Children sitting outside the cafe.

Children sitting outside the cafe.

While we were taking a breather at this cafe, a lady with a pet bird walked in! Seeing we were not from around here, and also that we were fangirling over her birdy (LOL), she was nice enough to put it on our table for us to pet.

Birdy at the cafe.

Birdy at the cafe.

Birdy on my shoulder!

Birdy on my shoulder!

He (she?) was placed on my shoulder afterwards! I learned that birds do have talons, and no matter how small and cute they are, they still hurt.

Yummy chicky.

Spicy Chicken Popcorn, TWD$70.

If you like popcorn chicken at KFC back home, you’ll love this. Unlike the ones served at the fast food joint, these are piping hot and really are quite spicy, as its name implies. I had to gulp down most of the water in my bottle just to soothe my tongue.

Cheese Fries, TWD $90.

Cheese Fries, TWD $90.

We decided to shop for awhile at Shinkuchan. The stalls lining its streets have an array of strange and wonderful offerings. For instance, we stupidly thought these were waterbottle holders (how is that even possible right?), but they turned out to be face masks. LOADS of people wear face masks in Taiwan. I’m still not very sure why.

Face Masks at Shinkuchan.

Face Masks at Shinkuchan.

We head off to Rui Feng Night Market later that evening for some shopping, games, and dinner – in the form of a steamboat.

Steamboat for dinner!

Steamboat for dinner! A big steamboat (with more ingredients than the small one I think), costs TWD$280. The small one costs $150.

The selection of foods you can dump into your steamboat.

The selection of foods you can dump into your steamboat. Green plates, containing mostly vegetables if I remember correctly, cost TWD$20. Blue-yellow plates cost TWD$30, and red plates that contain mostly seafood cost TWD$50.

After dinner and a couple snacks, we splurged on some childhood games that you likely can never find in Singapore. (At least, I can’t’ find them anywhere other than at carnivals, where they are insanely overpriced and not fun at all.)

A strange looking Mahjong game that according to R., is incredibly hard to win at.

A strange looking Mahjong game that according to R., is incredibly hard to win at. So we didn’t bother playing it.

Targets for the throwing rings game. Get your ring into the neck of the bottle and you get to take cheap alcohol home!

Targets for the throwing rings game. Get your ring into the neck of the bottle and you get to take cheap alcohol home!

A random couple throwing rings.

A random couple throwing rings.

The crazy amount of rings you get.

The crazy amount of rings you get for just TWD$50.

Our winnings!

Our winnings!

An air gun shooting game. Pop the balloons and win a prize! It's harder than it looks, mind you.

An air gun shooting game. Pop the balloons and win a prize! It’s harder than it looks, mind you.

Taiwan Day 1 – Kaohsiung (Feb 27)

February 27, 2013

I arrived at Changi Airport a decidedly tired little girl. My hands found themselves occupied pulling around the luggage bag my dad had generously lent me, which weighed a disappointing 11kg. (I had carefully weighed it at home to make sure it was as light as possible. I suppose my weighing scale is full of deceit.) My shoulders ached just the slightest bit from the 6kg worth of electronic gear (wow, I do sound like a tech geek) packed into my favourite porcupine-print backpack. My heart felt light as a feather though – I was about to embark on my first overseas trip without the annoying security of an adult presence, though I do suppose, turning 20 myself, I’ll be full grown much sooner than I think. My travel buddy and I were finally flying to Taiwan! Thank you Campus Magazine for this trip!

Flight departure timings listed at Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the day of our flight to Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Flight departure timings listed at Changi Airport Terminal 1 on the day of our flight to Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

The red-blue sunset out of the airplane's window.

The red-blue sunset out of the airplane’s window.

After about four hours, and a rather scary landing, Elizabeth Goh (left) and myself (right) have safely arrived at Kaohsiung Airport.

After about four hours and a rather scary landing, Eliz G. (left) and myself (right) safely arrived at Kaohsiung Airport.

We were lucky that Campus Magazine had generously arranged for us to be driven by an English-speaking local to Sanduo Hotel, where we were staying.

The namecards of Sanduo Hotel, where we stayed at.

The namecards of Sanduo Hotel, placed in a decorative casing at its reception table.

Sanduo Hotel Room 606, well, at least how it was before we messed it up.

Sanduo Hotel Room 606, well, at least how it was before we messed it up.

Elizabeth Goh with Recca's luggage.

Elizabeth Goh with her friend R.’s luggage.

Being full of energy from the flight and short drive, Eliz G., her friend R, who just happened to be on the same flight as us, and myself decided to take a cab down to Liu He Night Market, arguably the most touristy night market in Kaohsiung.

Streets of Kaohsiung are almost always illuminated by the rows and rows of decorative lights.

Streets of Kaohsiung are almost always illuminated by the rows and rows of decorative lights.

When at a Taiwanese night market, the one thing you absolutely cannot afford to miss out on is their food.

Coffin bread at Liu He Night Market.

Coffin bread at Liu He Night Market.

Pork ball soup at Liu He NIght Market.

Pork ball soup at Liu He Night Market.

R.'s dog, Cookies! I guess he was a little fidgety at dinner so R. took him out to play.

R.’s dog, Cookies! I guess he was a little fidgety at dinner so R. took him out to play.

Mushrooms ready for the eating!

Mushrooms ready for the eating!

A Garbage Bag Milk Tea Stall located along the streets of the night market.

A Garbage Bag Milk Tea Stall located along the streets of the night market.

Garbage Bag Milk Tea.

Garbage Bag Milk Tea.

One more thing you’ll start to notice, the Taiwanese apparently do love crane machines very much. You find them practically everywhere. Best of all, its much easier to win prizes from these compared to the ones back home.

A gangnam style slot machine that we came across while walking along the streets of Liu He Night Market.

A gangnam style slot machine that we came across while walking along the streets of Liu He Night Market.

Check out all the little psys at the crane machine!

Check out all the little psys at the crane machine!

Craving something a little sweeter, we then exited the night market to find that located only opposite the road was the towering candyland of Crown & Fancy, perfect for the chocolate and candy lover.

Crown & Fancy’s outlet at Liu He Night Market, 高雄自立二路107號

Jpghigh_Cream-Puff

05. Cream Puff (鮮奶油泡芙) $55 NTD

108 Sweet Choco Love, TWD$65

Almond Cake with Lemon & Chocolate Mousse (畢業盛典), $59 NTD

Me at Crown & Fancy on our first night! (At about 3am.)